Inside Elite Boats

Inside Elite Boats: Todd Faircloth

Elite Series angler Todd Faircloth takes us on a tour of his Skeeter.

<p>Todd Faircloth in his FX20 Skeeter powered by a Yamaha 250 SHO.</p>
Photo: Seigo Saito - Todd Faircloth in his FX20 Skeeter powered by a Yamaha 250 SHO.
Faircloth trolls with a Motor Guide Trolling Motor. He says the recess panel for the foot control, which allows him to keep his foot even with the deck of the boat, is a lot easier on your hips and back.
Photo: Seigo Saito - Faircloth trolls with a Motor Guide Trolling Motor. He says the recess panel for the foot control, which allows him to keep his foot even with the deck of the boat, is a lot easier on your hips and back.
A Lowrance HDS-9 graph and a Hyrdowave Electronic Fish Stimulator are among the items you'll find on Faircloth's front deck. He also has up and down controls for his Power Pole shallow-water anchors.
Photo: Seigo Saito - A Lowrance HDS-9 graph and a Hyrdowave Electronic Fish Stimulator are among the items you'll find on Faircloth's front deck. He also has up and down controls for his Power Pole shallow-water anchors.
Faircloth said he carries as many as 30 rods in his rod locker during practice.
Photo: Seigo Saito - Faircloth said he carries as many as 30 rods in his rod locker during practice. "I like to have different line sizes, different baits, different combinations," he said. "When I get an idea out there on the water, I can just reach inside the rod box and grab it usually. By the time a tournament starts, hopefully I can take 10-15 of those rods out."
He uses Castaway Rods and Shimano Reels.
Photo: Seigo Saito - He uses Castaway Rods and Shimano Reels.
In the center box closest to the trolling motor, Faircloth carries his hard baits like crankbaits and jerkbaits.
Photo: Seigo Saito - In the center box closest to the trolling motor, Faircloth carries his hard baits like crankbaits and jerkbaits. "The reason for that is they are lighter than plastic worms and stuff like that," he said. "I keep them up in that front box, and that allows me to get more bow lift out of my boat."
A wide selection of lipless crankbait color patterns.
Photo: Seigo Saito - A wide selection of lipless crankbait color patterns.
A staple for most Elite Series anglers - the jig box.
Photo: Seigo Saito - A staple for most Elite Series anglers - the jig box.
At the beginning of every tournament season, Faircloth has all of his boxes perfectly organized and labeled with black magic marker. But by the end of the season (when these photos were taken), he says the labels have usually been rubbed off.
Photo: Seigo Saito - At the beginning of every tournament season, Faircloth has all of his boxes perfectly organized and labeled with black magic marker. But by the end of the season (when these photos were taken), he says the labels have usually been rubbed off.
More of the hard-plastic baits that Faircloth carries near the front of his boat.
Photo: Seigo Saito - More of the hard-plastic baits that Faircloth carries near the front of his boat.
A box filled with square-billed crankbaits.
Photo: Seigo Saito - A box filled with square-billed crankbaits.
Faircloth said he takes some plastics out of their original packaging and places them in boxes for organizational purposes.
Photo: Seigo Saito - Faircloth said he takes some plastics out of their original packaging and places them in boxes for organizational purposes.
He organizes plastics by bait type and color pattern.
Photo: Seigo Saito - He organizes plastics by bait type and color pattern. "I like to have a box with just ochos, a box with just rodents," he said. "I keep my basic colors in there that I use a lot. I store them in my Planos like that, but I have a bunch of reserves in my truck that I carry in their original bags. For a tournament, I normally have it narrowed down to what I think I’ll use for that particular event, and I’ll take a bunch of that reserve stuff out of my truck and put in my boat."
More worm hooks than the average fisherman could use in five years.
Photo: Seigo Saito - More worm hooks than the average fisherman could use in five years.
A worm weight for every situation.
Photo: Seigo Saito - A worm weight for every situation.
Again, Faircloth's labeling system is showing the wears on a long year on the Elite Series.
Photo: Seigo Saito - Again, Faircloth's labeling system is showing the wears on a long year on the Elite Series.
In the big storage compartment on the right side of his boat, Faircloth carries an extra spool of line, a spare trolling motor, his fire extinguisher, a tow rope, spinnerbaits in bags and all of his treble hooks.
Photo: Seigo Saito - In the big storage compartment on the right side of his boat, Faircloth carries an extra spool of line, a spare trolling motor, his fire extinguisher, a tow rope, spinnerbaits in bags and all of his treble hooks. "It's mostly a lot of stuff I don’t use a whole bunch," he said. "But it needs to be in my boat in case I need it."
Faircloth prefers keeping his spinnerbaits in Bass Pro Shops Extreme Finesse Binders as opposed to standard boxes with hanging racks.
Photo: Seigo Saito - Faircloth prefers keeping his spinnerbaits in Bass Pro Shops Extreme Finesse Binders as opposed to standard boxes with hanging racks.
He says the bags are the best way he's found to preserve a spinnerbait.
Photo: Seigo Saito - He says the bags are the best way he's found to preserve a spinnerbait. "The boxes where you hang them tend to tarnish your blades," he said.
During a tournament, Faircloth said he uses his day box more than any other box on his boat.
Photo: Seigo Saito - During a tournament, Faircloth said he uses his day box more than any other box on his boat. "It’s small, and it’s compact," he said. "The plastics I’ll be using for a given day are going to be in that box, so I can just flip it open and grab what I need. Time is of the essence on the water when we’re out here fishing a tournament. You have to be organized and know where everything is at. I want to be able to get to it and get to it quick."
The tool rack every angler needs.
Photo: Seigo Saito - The tool rack every angler needs.
Faircloth said the cooler in the middle of his boat is very well insulated, and it's where he keeps all of his drinks, snacks and cold food.
Photo: Seigo Saito - Faircloth said the cooler in the middle of his boat is very well insulated, and it's where he keeps all of his drinks, snacks and cold food.
The glove box is where he keeps an extra pair of sunglasses, along with rags, towels, spray for his electronics and sometimes his keys.
Photo: Seigo Saito - The glove box is where he keeps an extra pair of sunglasses, along with rags, towels, spray for his electronics and sometimes his keys.
Faircloth has been with Skeeter for his entire career.
Photo: Seigo Saito - Faircloth has been with Skeeter for his entire career.
He runs a Lowrance HDS-9 graph unit on his console.
Photo: Seigo Saito - He runs a Lowrance HDS-9 graph unit on his console.
A small storage pouch near his Hot Foot throttle control holds several important items, including his sunscreen.
Photo: Seigo Saito - A small storage pouch near his Hot Foot throttle control holds several important items, including his sunscreen. "As anglers, we need to use sunscreen every day," Faircloth said. "Sometimes, I get wrapped up in what I'm doing and forget. But if it's right there where I can see it, I'm more likely to remember."
Faircloth said the box behind the driver's seat is for extra tackle.
Photo: Seigo Saito - Faircloth said the box behind the driver's seat is for extra tackle. "It's for stuff I don’t really think I’ll use," he said. "It's for just-in-case type stuff."
Culling rings stay in his live well at all times.
Photo: Seigo Saito - Culling rings stay in his live well at all times.
The box behind Faircloth's passenger seat is a storage box for things like extra tools, a spare prop and a hammer.
Photo: Seigo Saito - The box behind Faircloth's passenger seat is a storage box for things like extra tools, a spare prop and a hammer.
In the back box, Faircloth keeps a block and a prop wrench - just in case he needs to change props during a tournament.
Photo: Seigo Saito - In the back box, Faircloth keeps a block and a prop wrench - just in case he needs to change props during a tournament.
<p>Thanks for the tour, Todd! </p>
Photo: Seigo Saito - Thanks for the tour, Todd!