Kayak bass fishing

Easy tethers for kayak fishing

As the least organized kayak angler I know, I use lanyards, aka tethers, to help keep my fishing tools, such as pliers and scissors, handy and prevent them from sliding under my chair or out of the yak. Some folks put longer tethers on fishing rods, landing nets and fish-measuring devices. I personally am more concerned about getting tangled in lanyards upon capsizing than I am of ­booting any of those things into the drink.  <p> To make your own coiled lanyards inexpensively, use round trimmer line (both the .080- and .095-inch sizes work). Just wrap it around 1/2- or 3/8-inch dowel rods and cook it. Cable clamps that fit snugly on the line create loops to accept small carabiners or chain-link connectors. One end attaches to the yak; the other end holds the tool.
Photo: Dave Mull - As the least organized kayak angler I know, I use lanyards, aka tethers, to help keep my fishing tools, such as pliers and scissors, handy and prevent them from sliding under my chair or out of the yak. Some folks put longer tethers on fishing rods, landing nets and fish-measuring devices. I personally am more concerned about getting tangled in lanyards upon capsizing than I am of ­booting any of those things into the drink. To make your own coiled lanyards inexpensively, use round trimmer line (both the .080- and .095-inch sizes work). Just wrap it around 1/2- or 3/8-inch dowel rods and cook it. Cable clamps that fit snugly on the line create loops to accept small carabiners or chain-link connectors. One end attaches to the yak; the other end holds the tool.
Cut dowel rods so they fit flat in a pot or an electric frying pan (found mine at a garage sale). Drill 1/8-inch holes 6 or 7 inches apart for tools — farther apart if making a leash for rods or a paddle. Insert line in one of the holes, leaving ample tag end, and wrap the line tightly around the dowel. When you reach the second hole, clip the line from the trimmer roll and insert it into the second hole. Make sure you leave plenty of tag when you clip.
Photo: Dave Mull - Cut dowel rods so they fit flat in a pot or an electric frying pan (found mine at a garage sale). Drill 1/8-inch holes 6 or 7 inches apart for tools — farther apart if making a leash for rods or a paddle. Insert line in one of the holes, leaving ample tag end, and wrap the line tightly around the dowel. When you reach the second hole, clip the line from the trimmer roll and insert it into the second hole. Make sure you leave plenty of tag when you clip.
Place dowel rods in boiling water for 15 minutes, then remove and pop the dowels in a freezer for 10 minutes or so.
Photo: Dave Mull - Place dowel rods in boiling water for 15 minutes, then remove and pop the dowels in a freezer for 10 minutes or so.
Remove the line from the dowel. It’s usable as is …
Photo: Dave Mull - Remove the line from the dowel. It’s usable as is …
… but for a tighter spring, turn the coils, one at a time, inside out. This might take you some time to figure out (it did me), but it’s easy once you do.
Photo: Dave Mull - … but for a tighter spring, turn the coils, one at a time, inside out. This might take you some time to figure out (it did me), but it’s easy once you do.
Make end loops: Pound your cable clamps tight with a hammer and then trim the tag ends. Add carabiners to attach your pliers, scissors, hook file, etc.
Photo: Dave Mull - Make end loops: Pound your cable clamps tight with a hammer and then trim the tag ends. Add carabiners to attach your pliers, scissors, hook file, etc.