Kayak bass fishing

Easy kayak anchor trolley

More bass anglers are learning how much an anchor helps deal with wind and waves to fish spots thoroughly. There are lots of ways to set up a ’yak with an anchor trolley, which allows you to move the anchor point on your boat, and here’s a simple one. We’ll cover some more ­permanent, intricate installations in future issues. <br><br> <b>Materials:</b> 3/16-inch nylon rope or 550 paracord, two pulleys, a carabiner, two wire clips (or pad eyes), rivets or bolts and nyloc nuts. <p> <em>All captions: Dave Mull</em>
Photo: Dave Mull - More bass anglers are learning how much an anchor helps deal with wind and waves to fish spots thoroughly. There are lots of ways to set up a ’yak with an anchor trolley, which allows you to move the anchor point on your boat, and here’s a simple one. We’ll cover some more ­permanent, intricate installations in future issues. Materials: 3/16-inch nylon rope or 550 paracord, two pulleys, a carabiner, two wire clips (or pad eyes), rivets or bolts and nyloc nuts. All captions: Dave Mull
1. Loop about 20 inches of rope through the pulley eye, tie a figure eight knot and attach it to the handle or handle base, bow and stern.
Photo: Dave Mull - 1. Loop about 20 inches of rope through the pulley eye, tie a figure eight knot and attach it to the handle or handle base, bow and stern.
2. Run rope through the top side of each pulley so you can tie the ends to the ­carabiner and form the ­bottom part of the loop.
Photo: Dave Mull - 2. Run rope through the top side of each pulley so you can tie the ends to the ­carabiner and form the ­bottom part of the loop.
3. Install the pad eyes or wire clips a few inches above the waterline to route the trolley rope alongside of the hull, so it doesn’t pop up on the deck. If you can ­access the inside of the hull, through-bolt these guides. If not, drill your holes and punch the pad eyes in place with ­rivets. Add a dab of silicone before securing the anchor.
Photo: Dave Mull - 3. Install the pad eyes or wire clips a few inches above the waterline to route the trolley rope alongside of the hull, so it doesn’t pop up on the deck. If you can ­access the inside of the hull, through-bolt these guides. If not, drill your holes and punch the pad eyes in place with ­rivets. Add a dab of silicone before securing the anchor.
4. Tie the carabiner to form your loop. Leave a tag end on your knots so you can tighten or loosen the trolley rope for optimal tension after the first use.
Photo: Dave Mull - 4. Tie the carabiner to form your loop. Leave a tag end on your knots so you can tighten or loosen the trolley rope for optimal tension after the first use.
5. Clip your anchor line in the carabiner. Now you can run your anchor off the bow, stern or anywhere in between. Or, stow your anchor and clip on a drift sock.
Photo: Dave Mull - 5. Clip your anchor line in the carabiner. Now you can run your anchor off the bow, stern or anywhere in between. Or, stow your anchor and clip on a drift sock.