Sweet Home Guntersville

Lake Guntersville, Alabama
Alabama's Lake Guntersville offers everything from vast weedy bays to creek channels, submerged bars and points, and deep channel edge fishing — and there are bass everywhere.

It’s not whether an angler wants to take a three-day man-cation to Alabama’s Lake Guntersville, it’s simply a matter of figuring out how to get there. After all, the 69,000-acre impoundment was ranked No.3 on Bassmaster’s 100 Best Bass Lakes list; has broken records with 100-plus-pound four-day limits in B.A.S.S. competition; is the site of the 2014 Bassmaster Classic; and is credited for helping Chris Lane win the 2012 Classic.

“I moved to Lake Guntersville in 2009 for a lot of reasons, none more important than using the lake to make me a more versatile fisherman. Had I not made that move and spent countless hours on this lake, I don’t know that I would have that Classic trophy on my mantle right now,” Lane admitted.

When asked how the Elite Series pro would tackle this gargantuan reservoir in mid-February, he was a little timid to offer details because he plans on adding a second Classic title to his résumé in 2014 and didn’t want to offer his competitors additional insight. However, Lane couldn’t help but offer some advice.

“This lake is special to me. And if someone drives all day to get here, I want them to experience just how special it is.”

That said, here are the Top 3 baits Lane would use in mid-February, the area he would target and how he works the lures.

1. DEEP CRANKIN’

It doesn't get any better than fishing this lake in February, and Chris Lane, Guntersville's favorite son, is certain the 2014 Classic will prove it.It doesn't get any better than fishing this lake in February, and Chris Lane, Guntersville's favorite son, is certain the 2014 Classic will prove it.
“The fish are going to be staging to spawn,” the Classic champ said. “So, focus solely on staging areas such as drops, channel swings and points.”

When asked if one part of the lake was better than another, he said absolutely not.

“That’s one of the great things about Guntersville, you can catch ’em in the north, east, south and west. You just have to identify the type of water they are using and fish it.”

Specifically, Lane looks for 3- to 5-foot flats, and then targets the drops off these flats.

“The fish will stage in 10 to 30 feet of water near a spawning flat. So, the first thing I do is fancast a Luck “E” Strike Freak deep crank, which dives to about 20 feet, to get ’em stirred up.”

If the fish are on the crankbait bite, you’ll know it fairly quickly. Lane likes shad colors for clear water and chartreuse shades for dirty water.

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