Always friendly Florida pro, Terry "Big Show" Scroggins

Always friendly Florida pro, Terry "Big Show" Scroggins, says there are three lures he won't leave home without in autumn — all of them crankbaits.

Terry Scroggins

Always friendly Florida pro, Terry "Big Show" Scroggins, says there are three lures he won't leave home without in autumn — all of them crankbaits. Actually, Scroggins was asked to pick any three lures in the world for autumn. No one said they had to be crankbaits.

Still, based on the famed fall shad migration, all three of his picks had treble hooks hanging from their bellies. "As most of us know, shad are pushing toward the back of the creeks this time of year. I chose three crankbaits because it's all about lures that resemble the dominant food source.

I chose a lipless XCalibur Xr50 (to fancast across the flats in the back of the creeks), an XCalibur XCS200 square bill crankbait (ideal for working through wood or around shallow rocks) and a deeper diving Bomber BD6F," said Scroggins. "That BD6F becomes the emergency back-up, so to speak Because much like the spawn, not all fall bass behave the same on any given day. In other words, not all the shad and bass migrate to the back of the creek at the same time.

If I'm struggling to catch them on top of the shallow flat or around shallow cover, I'll back off to the deeper creek channel and hunt 'em up with the BD6F. It runs about 10 feet deep," said Scroggins, who for 16 years worked in the family auto body business prior to turning pro.

What if they don't migrate much on your home waters? "Tidal water, along with a lot of the natural lakes like we have here in Florida doesn't have much of a shad migration. However, I can still use the Xr50 or the shallow running square bill to tick the tops of the aquatic vegetation. It doesn't have to involve the back of a creek," said Scroggins. "Whether you're following shad to the back of a creek, or fancasting a grass flat this time of year, you've got to look for the pattern within the pattern.

Pay attention to the little unique differences like an isolated log, or a ditch that's 12 inches deeper than the rest of the shallow flat. It doesn't have to be a profound difference," said Scroggins, winner of more than $1 million as a pro. "When you can find the shad, and find the unique cover they're relating to, then you're going to catch the bass. It's all about the food," said Scroggins. "

Take me, for example. If all I had to eat was hot dogs, I could survive. But if I heard they were serving a bunch of free lobster across town, that's where I'd be going.

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