Welcome to Splitsville

WHY NOT DROP SHOT?

Gary Klein likes to put the Berkley Chigger Craw on the business end of his split shot. This is one of the few ways to present a craw with subtletly.Laurie TisdaleGary Klein likes to put the Berkley Chigger Craw on the business end of his split shot. This is one of the few ways to present a craw with subtletly.
“Watch a split shot and a drop shot rig in a swimming pool and you’ll see that they are completely different presentations,” Klein says.

Because a drop shot weight is below the hook, you have a direct line to the bait. The slightest rod movement makes the bait respond with quick, sharp movements. But, when you move your rod with a split shot rig, the bait languishes behind the weight with a sluggish response.

“Some guys say a split shot is a downsized Carolina rig,” Klein says. “I agree, to some extent, but the split shot gives you a slower rate of fall. That’s one of the keys to its success.”

Clear, calm water is ideal for split shotting, Klein points out. Under these conditions, any lure that splashes into the water gets a bass’ attention. The slow sink rate of a subtle split shot rig has tremendous drawing power, Klein claims. Bass typically swim to the bait as it falls and strike soon after it touches bottom.

BAITS

Big difference: The drop shot keeps a bait in the same place, where a split shot lure can move freely.Jonathan H. MiloBig difference: The drop shot keeps a bait in the same place, where a split shot lure can move freely.
Although a split shot rig catches numbers of keepers, it also dupes quality bass for Klein. This is especially true when he dresses an EWG 2/0 light wire hook with a 3 1/2-inch Reaction Innovations Smallie Beaver. He claims that this lure’s bulky profile encourages big bass to “clock it.”

Other go-to split shot baits for Klein are Berkley’s 3-inch Power Chigger Craw and 5-inch Power Shaky Worm. Besides showing bass a super-subtle presentation, a split shot rig lets you fish where shaky head worms and drop shot rigs frequently snag.

“The split shot glides right over riprap,” Klein says. “And, it won’t pull your bait down into submerged grass where a bass can’t see it.”

CLAM UP

The oblong clam shot is less prone to snagging than a round split shot, which is why Elite Series pro Alton Jones of Lorena, Texas, prefers it. His basic setup consists of a 1/8-ounce clam shot 12 to 14 inches in front of a 4-inch Yum Mightee Worm Texas rigged on a 1/0 XCalibur Tx3 Wide Gap Worm Hook. A light action spinning outfit with 8-pound Silver Thread Fluorocarbon is Jones’ delivery system.

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