Terry "The Tool Man" Scroggins

Is Terry "Big Show" Scroggins' an angler or a general contractor?

A look inside the back of Terry "Big Show" Scroggins' Toyota Tundra spurs one question, "Is this guy an angler or a general contractor?"

It's a mad mix of everything from crankbaits to cordless drills. Big Show's inventory ranges from soft plastic Yum crawdads to a gas-powered electric generator. Scroggins leaves nothing to chance — and apparently nothing in his garage.

Let Big Show explain. "You never know what troubles you're gonna encounter when you're on the road half the year. You gotta be prepared to fix anything, and you gotta be prepared to help the other Elite Series guys fix their stuff too. We all help each other," said Scroggins, who is known for his generosity and compassion.

"Last week I broke out my tools and helped Jason Williamson replace a battery charger," said Scroggins. "We've got the best factory service crews in the business at our tournaments. And that's why every night when we get off the water there will be four or five anglers waiting in line for their services.

I've learned to watch what the service trailer guys do to fix things, and then I do it myself. Then I don't have to waste time waiting in line," said Scroggins. Triton's Andy Stallings says Scroggins is a good student. "A lot of times Terry will call me and ask for direction or advice on how to fix something, and usually he can do it himself," confirmed Stallings, who has managed the Triton service trailer for nine years.

Scroggins advises that turning wrenches is not only necessary but also wise. "Even when things don't necessarily need to be fixed, I try to make sure all the bolts are tight after every tournament and that everything is being maintained.

Years ago, the self-locking nuts on my outboard motor mount backed themselves loose, and it fell off the back of my boat as I was running at full speed down the St. John's River."

Fact is Scroggins has never been scared of mechanical issues. For 15 years, he prepped and painted 35 cars a week in the family auto body business. "I learned long ago that just about anything you tear up could be fixed if you've got the right tools and a little help from your buddy.

If you put me and ol' "G-Man" Gerald Swindle on a project, we can make anything work," laughed Scroggins.

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