Takahiro Omori's Mississippi River Big Bass

Takahiro Omori, or "Tak" as he's known on the tour, found his big bass spot close to home.

Takahiro Omori's Mississippi River Big Bass

Takahiro Omori, or "Tak" as he's known on the tour, found his big bass spot close to home."I caught her in Pool 19, not too far from the launch. My spot was a backwater slough full of bushes in about 12 inches of water," said the Emory, Texas, resident. "It was protected from the main river and offered lots of forage and cover. That's exactly what a bass needs to grow big, fat and old."Tak caught his bass flipping a Black Neon Sweet Beaver with a 4/0 Gamakatsu EWG worm hook and a 1/4-ounce Tru-Tungsten worm weight."I think if you're looking for a big bass you need to try to find the best spot around. Bass are some of the biggest and most vicious predators in the water. They get to live where they want. I know that's basic, but the basics are what keeps you on fish.After that it's all about hard work, especially when the bite's tough. You have to make sure you cover everything from every angle. You never know exactly where they'll be, what they'll bite or when they'll bite. I fished everything I could see — and some stuff I couldn't — with careful and precise bait placement. Omori flipped and pitched his Sweet Beaver with a 7-foot, 6-inch Team Daiwa Flipping Rod (heavy action) and a Team Daiwa reel (7.1:1 gear ratio) spooled with 56-pound-test Sunline Braid."The high-speed reel makes a big difference. It's all I use. The high gear ratio lets me collect slack line quickly when a bass bites, and it helps me keep my line tight during jumps or when they're swimming towards the boat. If you want to slow your bait down, all you have to do is reel slower."I know that lower gear ratios create more torque, but we don't need that much torque very often. Most of our fish — at least most of mine, anyway — can be easily controlled with a higher gear ratio. That's why I think it's the best overall choice."

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