2011 Elite Series - Pride of Georgia West Point Lake - LaGrange, GA, May 5 - 8, 2011

2011 Elite Series Pride of Georgia: Runnin’ and gunnin’

Anglers find they have to move around to pick up fish

David Hunter Jones
Hole shots and moves have been a mainstay on West Point Lake.

LAGRANGE, Ga. -- Crude oil demand might rise this week considering how much gas Elite Series pros are burning on West Point Lake.

 Many aren’t even picking up the trolling motor as they move from spot to spot. With a tougher bite Friday, even more moves will be made. Steve Kennedy made a stop at one cypress tree, made two casts then moved on. Casey Ashley wasn’t far off Kennedy’s furious pace.

 “Yesterday I didn’t catch two fish off of the same place, and everybody’s doing the same thing,” Ashley said. “There was a good chance somebody hit it five minutes before you did, so you just pick up and go somewhere else. There’s not much cover in this lake, so you need to move around a lot.

 Pat Golden agrees.

 “I’m just fishing anywhere that I think a fish would live. You hit a stump here, laydown there,” he said. “You’re not going to load the boat up in just one area. It can be a pain fishing like this.”

 However, some anglers are more methodical and thorough in their approach. Brent Chapman believes that West Point’s postspawn bass are exceedingly fickle and need some coaxing before they bite.

 “For me, I just pick and area and make the most of it,” he said. “Unless you’re running a specific pattern -- and that’s what a lot of guys are doing -- you’ve got to pick a place and stay with it. I saw people zig-zagging and moving all around, though. Usually when that’s the case, they’re trying to figure something out.”

 Bill Lowen set aside his run-and-gun ways and made it work for him. He said that when he gets bites, they’re the right ones.

 “I’m just going to milk my spot it for all its worth,” he said. “I had what I had yesterday (18-9 for 7th place) by 10:30, and left the area to save it for today.”

 On the other hand, Davy Hite’s outboard won’t get a chance to cool down.

 “I don’t know how well these fish replenish on any one spot, so I’m always moving,” he said. “This time of year, the lake fishes small and the whole place gets a lot of pressure. You’ve got to move a lot!”

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